Thursday, June 14, 2012

Prometheus

Let’s face it, Sci-fi films just aren’t everyone’s cup of molecular tea. It requires a fundamental prerequisite, namely that you totally disregard what you believe to be the truth about the universe and accept the far-fetched world you are being sucked into. A brilliant Science fiction tale, like Prometheus however creates a world so seemingly plausible and immersive that it’s almost impossible not to get totally lost in its beautiful corridors of suspenseful fantasy.

“…a world so seemingly plausible and immersive that it’s almost impossible not to get totally lost in its beautiful corridors of suspenseful fantasy.”

Before I continue, please note that this review is not written from the perspective of a fan of the Alien series of films, which Prometheus is intended to be a prequel of. I do however acknowledge that many critics have pointed out their disappointed with the film’s inability to reveal further insights into the Alien/Predator universe. Having however not watched these films, I regard Prometheus as a totally separate film experience, basing my judgements solely on the film itself and not the expectations that Alien fans might have of it.


Michael Fassbender is the most human-like cyborg you'll ever meet.

With that disclaimer out of the way, let me say this: Prometheus is a superior, well rounded sci-fi splendour that should result in a truly memorable film experience for almost any type of film fan. Director Ridley Scott spins an enthralling web with a surprisingly simple and unoriginal premise: Two scientists/archaeologists/anthropologists discover a celestial pattern in a bunch of caves across the world and somehow convince a company with a very generous social investment budget to send them on a 2 billion dollar spaceflight to find proof of extra-terrestrial life.

The crew on board with them are a bunch of interesting misfits, which include one of the stars of the show, a Cyborg called David, played with an ironic level of authenticity by Michael Fassbender. Charlize Theron is also on the ship, fulfilling the role of corporate bitch and Guy Pearce plays a ridiculously old fart with an unhealthy obsession with alien life forms – Not their best performances by far, but good enough not to be too bothersome.

But this film isn’t about acting – It’s about aliens, blood and amazing special effects, with the most memorable achievement of the film definitely being its high aptitude for complete viewer engrossment. Before long, you’ll feel as if you’re fighting for your life alongside the film’s very unlucky protagonist, played remarkably well by the star of the original Millennium trilogy, Noomi Rapace. There’s a thick sense of dread, urgency and hopelessness here that is so hypnotizing that you’ll find it hard to snap out of this beautifully dark sci-fi trance once the credits start rolling. 

“There’s a thick sense of dread, urgency and hopelessness here that is so hypnotizing that you’ll find it hard to snap out of this beautifully dark sci-fi trance once the credits start rolling.”

Whilst the screenplay might be a bit jumbled and confusing, Ridley Scott definitely gets the pacing perfectly down. Once the film moves into its more serious and darker regions, it does so with a deliberate bang that is sure to catch you off guard in the most wonderful of ways. The sheer grotesqueness of it all is so unexpected and brutal that it will either shock you or make you purr with delight. Either way, this transition is the highlight of the entire film and alone will give you enough value for your movie ticket purchase.

All of this intense bloodshed however splatters on a magnificent canvas – Prometheus’ set design and visual effects are beautifully integrated and unified, resulting in a film that is oxymoronically as beautiful as it is terrifyingly dreadful. The corridors of the alien structures the crew explore are as beautiful untouched as they are when covered in the blood of the humans who foolishly ventured there.


Parental guidance should have been advised here...

Prometheus is a commanding and superbly balanced film that might just end nurturing a new sense of fearful respect for the universe within you. Be warned.

Highlight: You’ll know it when it happens. I’m never looking at parenting the same ever again. Ever.